Opinion | Georgia Spa Shootings: The Fears and the Questions

To the Editor:

Re “Rampage in Georgia Deepens Fears of Rising Anti-Asian Hatred in U.S.” (front page, March 18):

The killing of eight mostly Asian women has shocked people across the country, including me, a Chinese-American woman who grew up in Georgia. While I deeply sympathize with the loss for the family members of those affected, I am not surprised that such an incident occurred.

What I saw was the same anger, the same white male rage, that I’ve seen again and again while growing up in the South. This kind of perverse Asian fetishism and white privilege are not well addressed in discussions of race and gender.

The media and crime investigators need to stop waiting for evidence of a racially motivated attack and address it as it is. What happened on Tuesday was a mass murder, a crime against the Asian-American community, toxic gender violence and violence stemming from white supremacy.

Lillian Wang
Atlanta

To the Editor:

Much has been made of the fact that the victims of the shooting rampage in the Atlanta area were mostly Asian women at massage parlors. What has not been addressed are the stark facts about gun ownership in the United States.

This country is awash in guns of all types. There are more guns owned by citizens in the United States than there are citizens. How many more killing sprees will it take for our politicians to overcome their cowardly fear of the National Rifle Association?

It is way past time to go beyond “our thoughts and prayers” going to the families of victims. It is time to address the deadly menace of a citizenry that is highly armed while largely unregulated, and lethally dangerous, as we have just seen … again.

Ann B. Vehslage
Skillman, N.J.

To the Editor:

This attack on Asian women should also lead to an investigation of why many spas are allowed to operate as thinly disguised covers for brothels. Massage parlors are exploiting trafficked Asian women. The shootings in Georgia should not just raise the issue of anti-Asian feelings, but also lead to the closing of illegally run operations.

Ann Lee
Bronx

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