Brexit: Bitter EU threatens to AXE deal as Britain builds ties with Australia and US

Brexit: David Williamson discusses the fallout of leaving the EU

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Data is allowed to flow freely between the UK and the EU as a result of a so-called adequacy decision. However, in a mass overhaul of its data regime, the UK plans to water down its data protection rules post-Brexit and pursue agreements with non-EU countries — such as Australia and the US. This means that the EU could decide that the UK no longer adheres to sufficient standards and could stop the free flow of information between the UK and the EU. The bloc has warned that it will remove its data-sharing agreement with the UK if it feels the privacy of its citizens is threatened.

 

KEY EVENTS

  • Bitter EU threatens to AXE deal as Britain builds ties with Australia and US08:22
  • Rejoiners have been condemned for using Ukraine crisis for a Brexit attack

    Anti-Brexit campaigners have been described as “disgusting” after blaming Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on Brexit.

    One Twitter user said: “unfortunately, a vote for Brexit was a vote for Putin to invade Ukraine because it weakened the Western alliance and emboldened Putin. Putin’s people engineered this by bankrolling the Conservative Party and the Brexit campaign, which is why Johnson has hidden the Russia Report.”

    Former politician Daniel Hannan slammed the notion as “completely untrue” and condemned “the determination of FBPE Twitter to twist even the Ukrainian tragedy into an attack on their own country is no longer surprising; but it is still disgusting.”

    The row erupted over discussions about Britain’s response to Ukrainian refugees and the confusion surrounding their promise to help the people of Ukraine. 

    Fury at ‘EU cowards’ after US unleashes sanctions to ‘choke’ Russia

    The EU has been slammed as “cowardly” as the US released sanctions aimed to “choke” the Russian economy.

    Heavy sanctions on Russia specifically from Britain and the United States would “choke off a lot of the liquidity in Russian banks” according to currency specialist Patrick Reid. 

    He added that “losing the reserves would be a huge blow.”

    Express.co.uk readers expressed their views that the EU who has been criticised for not being tough enough on Russia lack the nerve to go against the Russian President. 

    One user concluded: “The EU are cowards.”

    Chris Packham warns PM against fur and foie gras U-turn

    TV Naturalist Chris Packham set up a petition demanding the import ban of fur and foie gras remains part of the new Animals Abroad Bill.

    Boris Johnson is reported to be prepared to ditch the plan following opposition from Cabinet ministers. 

    The process of producing foie gras and fur farming are illegal in the UK already and the wildlife presenter said: “We can’t say we don’t condone that sort of cruelty on our own shores and then import it from overseas. It’s hypocrisy of the very first order.”

    He urged that the ban would “send a clear message to the rest of the world” though Brexit Opportunities Minister Jacob Rees-Mogg, is thought to believe that the ban would restrict personal choice. 

    Fury as Brussels continues to fund Putin with gas exports

    Political experts have raised the issue of Europe’s reliance on Russia for gas and oil exports which may allow President Putin to continue attacking Ukraine despite harsh sanctions. 

    Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said at the EU leaders’ summit that “Putin is taking money from us…and is turning this into aggression.”

    Though the Russian Ruble has fallen dramatically as a consequence of financial sanctions, but experts have said that Europe’s dependence on gas and oil for Russia will mean the sanctions do not have enough of an impact. 

    Sanction expert Tyler Kustra works at the University of Nottingham and spoke to the BBC saying: “If you look at the Russian economy, it’s largely dominated by sending oil and natural gas to Europe.

    “So as long as we allow the oil and natural gas to flow, we’re not doing as much as we can to cripple Vladimir Putin’s war machine.”

    Red tape fury as businesses look to Canada for inspiration – greater restrictions loom

    Businesses have hit out at post-Brexit red tape, looking to Canada for inspiration as greater UK restrictions loom.

    In the Canadian province of British Columbia, removing unnecessary regulation has resulted in significant economic growth and productivity gains.

    According to the government of British Columbia, the region has eliminated more than 1,700 requirements and completed over 80 red tape reduction projects.

    Speaking about the province’s approach, Mike Cherry, chair of the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB), told the FT: “This model could be implemented in the UK if we can embrace a culture where regulation is not the default response to policy problems.”

    He added: “Small firms were promised that one upside of leaving the EU would be reduced red tape.

    “They live in hope of delivery.”

    This comes as the business world is becoming increasingly frustrated by the government’s failure to remove EU red tape after leaving the single market on January 1, 2021.

    In a report to mark the end of the first year of the implementation of the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement, the British Chambers of Commerce found nearly half of its members had struggled to trade with the EU.

    The introduction of the UK’s own UKCA quality control mark and the creation of a “UK REACH” chemical safety database, both appear to duplicate EU regulation for no obvious commercial gain.

    The Government has since extended the UK Reach registration deadline to 2025, offering to explore “a new model” to “reduce the need for replicating EU Reach data packages”.

    Sort it out! Fury erupts after Britons have EU funding REVOKED in bitter row

    Scientists in Britain have had funding revoked by the European Union due to delays caused by failed talks over Northern Ireland.

    The loss in grants led to warnings British science faces the threat of a damaging brain drain which could see top young research talent leaving Brexit Britain.

    Senior scientists told The Guardian that the UK’s scientific standing is at serious risk while others warned major programmes face cancellation.

    Martin Smith, head of policy at the Wellcome Trust, told The Guardian: “There is a real prospect that bright young scientists will decide it will be best for their careers if they leave the UK.

    “At the same time, if research partnerships involving the UK break down, Britain will no longer be seen as a reliable scientific partner. UK science will suffer.”

    According to The Guardian, British science is threatened due to the Government’s ongoing rows with the EU.

    Post-Brexit, ministers had agreed a deal allowing the UK to carry on playing a major role in Europe’s vast research programme. However, the subsequent failure of talks over Northern Ireland has resulted in a major delay with the arrangement.

    Protocol has cast a ‘long shadow’ over politics and life in Northern Ireland

    The Northern Ireland Protocol has cast a “long shadow” over political arrangements at Stormont, Sir Jeffrey Donaldson, DUP leader, has said.

    Speaking at a plenary meeting of the British-Irish Parliamentary Assembly (Bipa), Sir Jeffrey said the Stormont Executive would only be restored when issues surrounding the protocol were resolved.

    But John Finucane, Sinn Fein MP, said he thought the protocol was a result of the DUP championing of the “hardest possible Brexit”.

    Northern Ireland’s powersharing Executive collapsed earlier this month when the DUP’s Paul Givan resigned as first minister in protest at the protocol.

    Sir Jeffrey continued: “Those who claim that the Northern Ireland Protocol is designed to protect the Good Friday Agreement and the political institutions that were created by it surely must now recognise that the three sets of relationships covered by the agreement have been damaged since the protocol was implemented.

    “The continued imposition of the protocol upon Northern Ireland has cast its long shadow over our political arrangements at Stormont, as well as on a north-south and east-west basis and the everyday lives of our people.

    “The genuine objections to it cannot be wished away, nor simply ignored.”

    Sir Jeffrey added: “As the leader of Northern Ireland’s largest party, I must stress that the problems of the protocol are not confined to unionists, but affect the everyday lives and livelihoods of everyone in Northern Ireland.

    “The long shadow of the Irish Sea border must be removed from our politics. It is holding us back.”

    Mr Finucane said the DUP boycott of the Executive and the North South Ministerial Council amounts to “an assault on the Good Friday Agreement itself.”

    He said it is a direct result of the “political fallout” between the Tories and the DUP.

    He continued: “Both championed the hardest possible Brexit yet take no responsibility for its consequences.”

    UK signs ‘greenest ever’ deal with New Zealand

    UK exports to New Zealand will have tariffs slashed as the two countries signed a new trade agreement described as “one of our greenest deals ever”.

    Anne-Marie Trevelyan, International Trade Secretary, and Damien O’Connor, New Zealand’s Minister for trade and export growth signed the deal today.

    The Department for International Trade said the trade relationship between the would be boosted by 60 percent. 

    Tariffs will also be eliminated on all UK exports to New Zealand, with customs procedures updated to include digital documents and cut-time customs clearance of as little as six hours.

    Many professionals will benefit from the deal, such as lawyers and auditors, who can work in New Zealand. Products such as Marlborough sauvignon blanc, manuka honey and kiwi fruit could also become cheaper.

    The Government said the deal was “the most advanced agreement New Zealand have signed with any nation bar Australia” and heralded it as “one of our greenest deals ever”.

    International Trade Secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan said: “This deal will slash red tape, remove all tariffs and make it easier for our services companies to set up and prosper in New Zealand.

    “Our trade with New Zealand will soar, benefiting businesses and consumers throughout the UK and helping level up the whole country.

    “Like all our new trade deals, it is part of a plan to build a network of trade alliances with the most dynamic parts of the world economy, so we set the UK on a path to future prosperity.”

    Good afternoon

    Good afternoon from London, I’m Rachel Hagan. I’ll be bringing you all the latest developments on Brexit for the next eight hours.

    Please feel free to get in touch with me as I work if you have a story or tips to share! Your thoughts are always welcome.

    Email: [email protected]

    Brexit Britain growing faster than France and Germany

    Britain’s small and medium businesses are growing faster than France and Germany, a report has shown. 

    More than two-thirds of British businesses are expected to grow this year, more than in France and Germany which are the EU’s biggest economies. 

    According to a report from accounting technology firm Sage, 68 percent of UK-based small and midsize businesses (SMBs) expect growth in 2022.

    In Germany, 57 percent of SMBs expect to grow, while in France this figures sits at 62 percent.

    In the UK, SMBs represent 61 percent of UK jobs and 52 percent of GDP.

    Brexit Britain signs £800million trade deal with New Zealand

    Brexit Britain has signed a new trade deal with New Zealand that is set to boost the UK’s economy by £800 million a year. 

    The deal is set to slash red tape and bureaucracy. 

    International Trade Secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan puts pen to paper this afternoon after meeting with the New Zealand Minister for Trade and Export Growth Damien O’Connor.

    Ms Trevelyan said: “This deal will slash red tape, remove all tariffs and make it easier for our services companies to set up and prosper in New Zealand.

    “Our trade with New Zealand will soar, benefiting businesses and consumers throughout the UK and helping level up the whole country.

    Michelle O’Neil slammed for United Ireland claims

    Sinn Fein’s deputy leader Michelle O’Neil has been slammed by Briton’s for claiming that thanks to Brexit, a United Ireland is “closer than ever before”. 

    One Express.co.uk reader said: “No need to thank us, we thank you for finally paying back the money we gave you, as your EU friends would not give you money to bail you out.”

    Another reader said: “A UNITED Ireland would cause the complete collapse of Northern Ireland’s economy and cost as much as €30 billion a year, according to a new report.”

    Remainer Anna Soubry claims UK will be back in EU ‘within 10 years’

    Remainer Anna Soubry has claimed that the UK will turn to the EU ‘within 10 years’. 

    In 2020, the former Tory MP told LBC: “When our economy suffers in the most dreadful way, everything will be blamed on Covid, when undoubtedly some of it will be on the fact we’ve left the European Union.

    “It is the stuff of madness, but we are where we are…I just think it’s a terrible tragedy and I think that’s how history will record it. Our country has made a terrible mistake.”

    She added: : “I think it will be my children’s generation that will do it, I think we’ll be back in the EU in ten years time. Of course we’ll never get the unique and very special and very good deal that we once had.

    “So no doubt the EU will say, ‘well, if you want to rejoin you have to join the Euro, you’ve got to join Schengen.’ We were in a unique position but there’s no point in looking backwards, we’ve got to look to the future.”

    Anger as Brexit Britain stripped of EU funding

    Britain has been stripped of EU funding because of a row over the Northern Ireland protocol. 

    Professor Chris Drakeley, at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, last week told the Guardian his team was “delighted” to receive a letter confirming a £6.7million EU grant for a malaria project.

    But just a couple of days later, “we got a new letter saying the UK was now ineligible to take part”.

    Express.co.uk readers have criticised Brussels for messing Britain about and acting like a “bully”.

    Morsecode asked: “Why are we helping out the EU if they treat us like dirt.”

    Russia’s invasion of Ukraine blamed on Brexit

    Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has been blamed on Brexit by some Britons. 

    Writer Marcus Chown told his almost 50,000 followers on Twitter the vote for Brexit was “a vote for Putin”.

    He wrote: “Unfortunately, a vote for Brexit was a vote for Putin to invade Ukraine because it weakened the Western alliance and emboldened Putin.

    “Putin’s people engineered this by bankrolling the Conservative Party and the Brexit campaign, which is why Johnson has hidden the Russia Report.”

    UK accused of broken promises over dredging

    The UK has been accused of making broken promises over dredging, which has increased in a protected site, despite a promise from the government that it would be banned. 

    The government had argued that before Brexit it did not have control over fishing practices. 

    However, a year after the government proposed to ban trawling and dredging fishing processes, The Marine Conservation Society found that the practice had actually increased in the Dogger Bank protected site. 

    It accused the government of “broken promises and delayed action” over the proposed fishing ban.

    The Dogger Bank MPA is a vital breeding ground for commercial species including cod and whiting, as well as sand eels, which are a food source for puffins, porpoises and kittiwakes.

    Bitter EU threatens to AXE deal as Britain builds ties with Australia and US

    The European Union has threatened to stop the free flow of data between the bloc and the EU if the UK pursues ties with the US and Australia.

    Data is allowed to flow freely between the UK and the EU as a result of a so-called adequacy decision.

    However, in a mass overhaul of its data regime, the UK plans to water down its data protection rules post-Brexit and pursue agreements with non-EU countries — such as Australia and the US.

    This means the EU could decide that the UK no longer adheres to sufficient standards and could stop the free flow of information between the UK and the EU.

    The bloc has warned that it will remove its data-sharing agreement with the UK if it feels the privacy of its citizens is threatened.

    Good morning

    Good morning, I’m Olivia Stringer and I’ll be bringing you all the latest developments on Brexit, for the next eight hours. Please feel free to get in touch with me as I work if you have a story or tips to share! Your thoughts are always welcome.

    Email: [email protected] 

    Twitter: @Livstringer_

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